Shane Stadler

Contact

Shane Stadler, Professor

Department of Physics & Astronomy

Louisiana State University

202 Nicholson Hall

Baton Rouge, LA 70803

225-578-2025

​stadler@phys.lsu.edu

Back to LSU Physics

We have facilities to fabricate and characterize a wide variety of material, including alloys, ceramics, thin films, and single crystals. On the fabrication side, we employ arc-melting, RF-melting, zone-growth of single crystals, transport growth, and pulsed laser deposition (for thin films).


On the characterization side, we have instruments to measure x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetometry (a MPMS system by Quantum Design), transport and heat capacity (a PPMS system also by QD), and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). In addition, LSU has a synchrotron facility (CAMD) where we have access to the world of X-rays and techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and others.


Finally, the Department of Physics & Astronomy has a liquid helium plant that recovers and liquefies helium used in low-temperature measurements. This is a huge advantage in terms of both cost and availability of the life blood of experimental condensed matter physics.

Fig. 1. Ultra-high vacuum and reactive atmosphere pulsed laser deposition chambers.

LSU Physics & Astronomy

We have facilities to fabricate and characterize a wide variety of material, including alloys, ceramics, thin films, and single crystals. On the fabrication side, we employ arc-melting, RF-melting, zone-growth of single crystals, transport growth, and pulsed laser deposition (for thin films).


On the characterization side, we have instruments to measure x-ray diffraction (XRD), magnetometry (a MPMS system by Quantum Design), transport and heat capacity (a PPMS system also by QD), and magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE). In addition, LSU has a synchrotron facility (CAMD) where we have access to the world of X-rays and techniques such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and others.


Finally, the Department of Physics & Astronomy has a liquid helium plant that recovers and liquefies helium used in low-temperature measurements. This is a huge advantage in terms of both cost and availability of the life blood of experimental condensed matter physics.

Fig. 2. Our group. From back to front: Emily Kramer (undergrad), Ahmad Us Saleheen (graduate student), Daniel Lepkowski (undergrad), and Tapas Samanta (postdoc). With me (mugshot on the homepage) that makes five.